Case Western Reserve University

Western Reserve College was established in 1826, and was named for the Connecticut Western Reserve, as Northeast Ohio was once known. Western Reserve was also one of the first colleges established in northern Ohio. In 1882 with funding from Amasa Stone, Western Reserve College was relocated to the Cleveland area, and changed its name to Western Reserve University. Case School of Applied Science was secretly being funded by Leonard Case Jr. ,who began donating valuable pieces of real estate to a trust in the name of Henry Gilbert Abbey, who was the confidential advisor to Case. Gilbert was asked to put the trust into action after Case was dead, but to keep it secret until then. In 1882 Case Institute was built. Case was originally located in downtown Cleveland, but  in 1885 Case School of Applied Science was moved to University Circle adjacent to Western Reserve University. During its growing years Case started to expand, and have a more broad selection of programs, that eventually led to it being called Case Institute of Science.

T. Keith Glennan was an amazing man in his own right, and the things he accomplished for Case Institute of Technology were never to be forgotten. He was the President of the school from September 1, 1947 thru June 30, 1966. In his eighteen years as President, Case added twelve new buildings to the campus, graduate students increased tenfold, faculty increased, and Case and WRU became one institution. Glennan having built up Case to a respectable level, then began to look to his neighboring university, WRU. He felt since they already had many cooperative degrees: why not combine the two schools for the better of Cleveland and the institutions. It was Glennan’s hope to become a world renowned University known for their scientific research abilities. 

A university that would bring in students and become known by the entire country seemed like a doable idea. The community predicted that the federation would make one of the largest private universities in the country; that would even rival that of Princeton, Chicago, and Stanford. In 1967 the merger finally occurred and Case Western Reserve University was now more than just a few peoples dreams, it was a reality.

Case School of Applied Science

Leonard Case Jr. started the groundwork for a school called Case school of Applied Sciences, this school was to train  men in engineering and applied science. Shortly After Case’s death the school was put into action, initially classes were held in the Case family home until 1885 were it was relocated to have an adjacent campus to Western Reserve University.

Image courtesy of Cleveland State University Michael Schwartz Special Collections Library

 

Western Reserve university

Case Western Reserve University was founded in 1826 back when it was known as Western Reserve college. Western Reserve College was the first college in northern Ohio, the college took its name from the surrounding which was known as, Western Reserve of Connecticut. In the late 1800s it stood out as one of the only school to embrace science ,and began to hire progressive scientist.

Image courtesy of Cleveland State University Michael Schwartz Special Collections Library

Amasa Stone Chapel

Built by Clara Stone Hay, wife of then United States Secretary of State John Hay and Flora stone Mather, as a memorial to their father Amasa Stone. As part of Case Western Reserve, it is used as a lecture hall, annual honors assemblies and many ceremonies of honor. 

Image courtesy of Cleveland State University Michael Schwartz Special Collections Library

Adelbert Hall

Adelbert Hall once the home to the original classroom building of Adelbert College, and a gift form Amasa Stone is now the administrative center of Case Western Reserve University. When this building was first introduced it served as the offices of the College presidents and treasurers.

Image courtesy of Cleveland State University Michael Schwartz Special Collections Library

Guilford House

Named after Linda Guiford the teacher of Flora Stone Mather, who gave this building to Western Reserve College. This building was the first  residence hall for the College for women. After this it was used for summer school language programs and it served as the first graduate student dormitory on the campus. 

Image courtesy of Cleveland State University Michael Schwartz Special Collections Library

Adelbert Gymnasium

This building was originally designed in the 1900′s as an armory for world war I training programs. But when the building was completed in 1919 WWI was over and the building was transformed into a gymnasium.It  is still used today for physical education and and some intramural activities.  

Image courtesy of Cleveland State University Michael Schwartz Special Collections Library

Student Health Center

Before the School moved to its present location at the corner of Ford Drive and East Boulevard this building was the school of law. After the move the building was renovated. In 1983 it became a 12 bed infirmary and houses specialty clinics to served as the universities health center.

Image courtesy of Cleveland State University Michael Schwartz Special Collections Library

Rockefeller Physics Building

Given as a gift to the Case Institution of technology by John D. Rockefeller, an original home owner on Millionaire’s Row. Unfortunately his  business endeavors had him leave Cleveland and  travel to New York. This building is one of the oldest buildings of Case Institution of technology, the original equipment for this building was brought from Europe

Image courtesy of Cleveland State University Michael Schwartz Special Collections Library

 

 

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3 Responses to Case Western Reserve University

  1. Avatar of Mark Souther Mark Souther says:

    “During the 1882 with funding from Amasa Stone, Western Reserve College was relocated to the Cleveland area and changed its name to Western Reserve University. ” — Change the beginning of the sentence to “In 1882, with funding…” or something like that to make it clearer.

    I think you need more on the Cold War context of the rise of Case Institute of Technology in the 1940s-60s. Glennan was a big name at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in the midst of his tenure as president, and he raised the institution’s profile tremendously. Case wanted to be seen alongside Cal Tech, Stanford, MIT, and other leading scientific research institutions in the rush for defense-related research and development. You might see if you can find something to this effect to add. A key piece of this endeavor that didn’t work out as planned was the University Circle Research Center (for which Special Collections has a good image in one of the Univ. Circle folders) in the mid-1960s. It was to be Cleveland’s answer to high-tech centers in suburban parts of other big cities.

    The second image (the color artists’ rendering) doesn’t match well with the caption. I suggest using this to talk about something of the 1960s period, which seems to be when this is from. Isn’t this a picture of the Case campus to the south of Euclid Avenue rather than WRU? I may be mistaken, but that’s how it appears to me.

    A number of grammatical mistakes in most of the captions need attention.

    Please fix the run-on sentence in the last caption (Physics Bldg).

  2. Avatar of zlafleur zlafleur says:

    Interesting read about the early history of Case Western Reserve, biggest critique I have is simply in the pursuit of more information. Certainly, learning how Case expanded and became the significant educational institution it is today is interesting, but I was left wanting more in regards to a specific program or two that they are well known for. Perhaps more information about the medical program and University Hospitals could be included?

  3. Avatar of cciullafaup cciullafaup says:

    Overall, this is good. Possibly a little more specific? I think the images are great.

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